Saturday, 15 November 2014

I WISH- IF ONLY



Wish and ‘If only’ are both used to talk about regrets – things that we would like to change either about the past or the present.

Talking about the present
  • If only I didn’t have so much homework I could go to the concert tonight. She has a lot of homework and she can’t go to the concert.
  • I wish you didn’t live so far away.
  • I wish I knew what to do.
When we talk about present regrets, both wish and if only are followed by the past simple tense. The past tense emphasises that we are talking about something ‘unreal’.

Talking about the past
  • I wish I’d studied harder when I was at school. He didn’t study harder when he was at school.
  • I wish I hadn’t eaten all that chocolate. I feel sick.
  • If only I’d known you were coming.
Both wish and if only are followed by the past perfect tense when we talk about past regrets.

Wish/if only and would

We use wish + would to talk about something in the present that we would like to change – usually something that we find annoying.
  • I wish you wouldn’t borrow my clothes without asking.
  • I wish it would rain. The garden really needs some water.
  • I wish you’d give up smoking. it’s really bad for you.
NB We can only use wish + would to talk about things we can’t change
CLICK HERE AND PRACTISE

CLICK HERE AND COMPLETE THE SENTENCES

I WISH- ONE DIRECTION


WHILE YOU WERE SLEEPING......

WATCH THIS VIDEO AND THEN REPORT THESE QUESTIONS AND SENTENCES TAKEN FROM THE MOVIE




CLICK HERE AND WATCH THE VIDEO

1) Will you marry me? ____________________________

2) Are you okay? _______________________________

3) There’s a train coming and it’s fast. ________________

4) Are you family? ______________________________

5) She’s his fiancee. _____________________________

6) I need to ask you a few questions. _________________

7) He is in a coma. ______________________________

8) He was pushed from the platform at the train station. ___

9) She jumped on the tracks. ______________________

10) She saved his life. _____________________________ 

REPORTED SPEECH

 You can  read some grammar about Reported Speech and then try to match these sentences 


CLICK AND MATCH

CLICK HERE AND PRACTISE SENTENCES

Tuesday, 11 November 2014

Gerund after Preposition (Verbs)

Gerund after prepositions (verbs)

We use the Gerund after prepositions.

verb + preposition
Exception: to
Here we use the phrase:
looking forward to + Gerund
Example:
I'm looking forward to seeing you soon.
We use the Gerund after the following phrases:
accuse ofThey were accused of breaking into a shop.
agree withagree with playing darts.
apologize forThey apologize for being late.
believe inShe doesn't believe in getting lost in the wood.
blame forThe reporter is blamed for writing bad stories.
complain aboutShe complains about bullying.
concentrate onDo you concentrate on reading or writing?
congratulate sb. onI wanted to congratulate you on making such a good speech.
cope withHe is not sure how to cope with getting older.
decide againstThey decided against stealing the car.
depend onSuccess may depend on becoming more patient.
dream about/ofSue dreams of being a pop star.
feel likeThey feel like going to bed.
get used toYou must get used to working long hours.
insist onThe girls insisted on going out with Mark.
look forward toI'm looking forward to seeing you soon.
prevent sb. from sth.How can I prevent Kate from working in this shop?
rely on sth.He doesn't rely on winning in the casino.
succeed inHow then can I succeed in learning chemistry?
specialize inThe firm specialized in designing websites.
stop sb. fromstopped Andrew from smoking.
talk about/ofThey often talk about travelling to New Zealand.
think ofFrank thinks of playing chess.
warn sb. againstWe warned them against using this computer.
worry aboutThe patient worries about having the check-up.